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  • The Oracle
    started a topic Miscellaneous And Off Topic Subjects

    Miscellaneous And Off Topic Subjects

    I hope most end up landing here. I'm gonna hang out here since this is one of my regular visits. Let's hope more follow.
    Last edited by lineygoblue; November 23rd, 2015, 07:52 PM.

  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    Emails obtained by CBS show Doug Manchester, a San Diego billionaire, offering to make a significant (around $500,000) donation to the RNC on the condition he was confirmed as Ambassador to the Bahamas

    The RNC has since returned all money it's ever received from Manchester (he gave $1M to the inaugural committee), cut all ties, and his nomination to the post (which has been stalled for 2 years) has been officially pulled.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/doug-ma...ion-uncovered/

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    Stories spread of a growing rift between Trump and Pompeo. Trump blames Pompeo for hiring "Never Trumpers" and not keeping them in line.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/tru...roles-n1082716

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    Would encourage people to go and look for video coming out of Hong Kong over the past 24-48 hours. Particularly related to Polytech U.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    Here's Donald Trump on Chris Wallace today. I saw this interview and Wallace repeatedly called out Scalise's lies.

    As Wallace said obviously: "I'm not the one with daddy issue"

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by lineygoblue View Post

    Maybe he's a little bit like you and I.

    I mean, when I go to get my yearly checkup, I don't go out on my front porch and say "HEY EVERYBODY, I'M GOING TO GET MY CHECKUP.... ANYONE WANT TO COME ALONG"???

    Maybe he wanted some privacy? That's what I read into it.
    Liney I did mean to comment on some of this medical stuff

    1) Trump was not previously scheduled to get a checkup or physical yesterday. It was decided to go to Walter Reed at the very, very last minute.

    2) Reporters were asked to not even tell the public where Trump was going until he was already there

    3) The WH and Hospital have both been dead silent on what tests Trump had. Although I admit Stephanie Grisham took time to announce Trump is the healthiest person to ever live or some such stupid shit.

    4) Trump's last physical was only 8 months ago so it's a little unusual that he would do another so soon

    5) There's a long history of Presidents lying about or covering up their health issues, whether it be Wilson or FDR, Kennedy or Reagan.

    6) Any President has less medical privacy than an ordinary person. If he's had a stroke, for example, he's is NOT entitled to keep quiet about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    As easily predicted, Steve Scalise goes on tv to prostrate himself and say the Republican last night would’ve lost by a much much larger margin had our beloved President not intervened. It’s a testament to just how terrific and popular our President is that the candidates he endorses keep losing by only small amounts.

    Leave a comment:


  • iam416
    replied
    It's a blunt comparison. I agree. There are lots of exceptions. Even in a single metro area. But I do think the Ven diagraom overlap is considerably more for midwestern suburbans/midwest rural as opposed to coastal urban/midwest surburban.

    And I'm fairly certain that suburban voters absolutely want PDJT out of office. So that appeal actually has a huge overlap with coastal/urban voters. Heh. But on policy, generally, I think it's the above.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    If you put a gun to my and force me to decide then i agree with you. Generally speaking a Midwest burb (except maybe around Chicago) is more prone to vote with Rural America than Urban America. With exceptions. A suburb like Shaker Heights or Bexley probably has more cultural affinity with the dreaded East Coast than Paulding County.

    Leave a comment:


  • iam416
    replied
    But when I say Dems should ignore the guy from Bucyrus, Ohio in the John Deere cap that thinks there needs to be more Christ in government. well that makes me an elitist. Heh
    My point is this: "the suburban midwest vote is more aligned with the rural midwest vote than it is with traditional urban vote. So, I think there is something to the notion that Ds have to appeal to more moderate interests -- the suburbanites." Appealing to someone in Bucyrus does a D candidate more good -- a lot more good, IMO, than appealing to someone in the Bronx.

    If you think the swing and/or suburban (I think they're largely the same) midwestern votes are more aligned with urban/coastal interests then we just disagree. That'd be the better statement, IMO, then some sort of snarky summary.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    Originally posted by iam416 View Post

    And you and I surely disagree on how much suburban voters are turned off by PDJT versus PDJT policies.



    Right. And what I would say, to build on Liney's point, is that the suburban midwest vote is more aligned with the rural midwest vote than it is with traditional urban vote. So, I think there is something to the notion that Ds have to appeal to more moderate interests -- the suburbanites. It doesn't matter this election because they hate PDJT so much. But, it will matter going forward (of course, you think not so much).

    I don't think the Rs should waste a second trying to persuade traditional urbanites. I do think they should at least try to sway some AA voters. As I've said, that bloc of voters has a similar cross-section to white voters -- they're probably even more socially conservative and I think suburban AAs are ripe for the picking. But, the Rs don't really bother.
    When Republicans ignore urban voters, that's because they're practical and sensible. But when I say Dems should ignore the guy from Bucyrus, Ohio in the John Deere cap that thinks there needs to be more Christ in government. well that makes me an elitist. Heh

    I made the point about all not all suburbs being the same a couple weeks ago. Waukesha County, WI, just west of Milwaukee, is a great example. There's been virtually no change in that county in Republican support since the 60's. It is rock solid Republican. Compare that with the suburbs around rapidly growing Sun Belt cities like Dallas and Atlanta and you've got a different story. SO you may be right that a Midwest suburb has more in common with the rural countryside than the urban core. But Parma ain't the same as Shaker Heights ain't the same as Grove City ain't the same as Reynoldsburg. Obviously. So we're speaking in very broad generalities.

    Parma's actually a pretty unique example...could probably talk a long time about that place. And the suburb outside Chicago where my brother lives is very heavily Polish as well and today it has the same political outlook.

    Leave a comment:


  • iam416
    replied
    I think Trump has made more permanent changes to the R Party than you probably do. Not "for all time" changes but a decade , possibly more. I don't think in 2024, for example, it's foreseeable that an anti-Trump Republican wins the nomination, no matter WHAT happens in 2020.
    And you and I surely disagree on how much suburban voters are turned off by PDJT versus PDJT policies.

    It varies state-to-state, but to win statewide office in the Midwest, Republicans need to do better than just 50% of the suburban vote
    Right. And what I would say, to build on Liney's point, is that the suburban midwest vote is more aligned with the rural midwest vote than it is with traditional urban vote. So, I think there is something to the notion that Ds have to appeal to more moderate interests -- the suburbanites. It doesn't matter this election because they hate PDJT so much. But, it will matter going forward (of course, you think not so much).

    I don't think the Rs should waste a second trying to persuade traditional urbanites. I do think they should at least try to sway some AA voters. As I've said, that bloc of voters has a similar cross-section to white voters -- they're probably even more socially conservative and I think suburban AAs are ripe for the picking. But, the Rs don't really bother.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    And stuff like this is why the tax cuts aren't popular even among Trump's populist base

    ********************************

    WASHINGTON — In the 2017 fiscal year, FedEx owed more than $1.5 billion in taxes. The next year, it owed nothing. What changed was the Trump administration’s tax cut — for which the company had lobbied hard.

    The public face of its lobbying effort, which included a tax proposal of its own, was FedEx’s founder and chief executive, Frederick Smith, who repeatedly took to the airwaves to champion the power of tax cuts. “If you make the United States a better place to invest, there is no question in my mind that we would see a renaissance of capital investment,” he said on an August 2017 radio show hosted by Larry Kudlow, who is now chairman of the National Economic Council.

    Four months later, President Trump signed into law the $1.5 trillion tax cut that became his signature legislative achievement. FedEx reaped big savings, bringing its effective tax rate from 34 percent in fiscal year 2017 to less than zero in fiscal year 2018, meaning that, overall, the government technically owed it money. But it did not increase investment in new equipment and other assets in the fiscal year that followed, as Mr. Smith said businesses like his would.

    Nearly two years after the tax law passed, the windfall to corporations like FedEx is becoming clear. A New York Times analysis of data compiled by Capital IQ shows no statistically meaningful relationship between the size of the tax cut that companies and industries received and the investments they made. If anything, the companies that received the biggest tax cuts increased their capital investment by less, on average, than companies that got smaller cuts.

    FedEx’s financial filings show that the law has so far saved it at least $1.6 billion. Its financial filings show it owed no taxes in the 2018 fiscal year overall. Company officials said FedEx paid $2 billion in total federal income taxes over the past 10 years.

    As for capital investments, the company spent less in the 2018 fiscal year than it had projected in December 2017, before the tax law passed. It spent even less in 2019. Much of its savings have gone to reward shareholders: FedEx spent more than $2 billion on stock buybacks and dividend increases in the 2019 fiscal year, up from $1.6 billion in 2018, and more than double the amount the company spent on buybacks and dividends in fiscal year 2017.


    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/17/b...bill-to-0.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    It varies state-to-state, but to win statewide office in the Midwest, Republicans need to do better than just 50% of the suburban vote. I think they typically need closer to 60-70%. I mean, if DeWine had only won 51% of the vote in places like Butler County, Delaware County, Medina County, etc. then Cordray might've won. Instead he got 61-67% in all the Cincinnati burbs and upper 50's-low 60's in most of the Columbus/Cleveland burbs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Strangelove
    replied
    I think Trump has made more permanent changes to the R Party than you probably do. Not "for all time" changes but a decade , possibly more. I don't think in 2024, for example, it's foreseeable that an anti-Trump Republican wins the nomination, no matter WHAT happens in 2020.

    Leave a comment:

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